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Land Snails and Millipedes Transect

Triodopsis snail, side view (NPS photo)

Background

Land snails are an easily overlooked and understudied part of the ecology in the southern and central Appalachians. Of the more than 1,000 species known to occur in North America, 25 have been identified on the Parkway, but another 125 are likely to be found here, some of which may be rare or even endemic.

Land snails, semi-slugs, and slugs contribute significantly to decomposition and nitrification of soils through their decaying bodies and feces. Their dead shells are a principal source of calcium. Land snails recycle forest nutrients and are prey for a number of vertebrate (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) and invertebrate (insects, carnivorous snails) species. Carnivorous snails feed on earthworms, insect larvae, and other snails. Some species consume dead and rotting organic materials while others eat live plants, especially seedlings and tender plants. Though poorly understood, some snails prefer to eat fungi and may be an important factor in dispersal of fungal spores.

Land snails are important environmental indicators and biodiversity predictors. Because of their close association with water, mollusks are good indicators of the health of the environment and may play an important role in monitoring climate change. Despite fabulous adaptations to land, snails are among the most sensitive animals to pollutants, including road runoff and acidic rainfall. Land snail populations have dwindled in recent decades, in turn contributing to the decline of some species of birds that feed on them and depend on them as sources of calcium for creating egg shells.

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Bureau of Land ManagementUS Forest ServiceNational Park ServiceUS Fish and Wildlife ServiceEnvironmental Protection AgencyNational Oceanic & Atmospheric AdministrationDepartment of EducationNational Environmental Education Foundation
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